Apathy

The dialectic of the soul implies volition.  Motives may vary but one aspect of the practice of discretion remains consistent: it is proactive. The individual conscientiously applies himself to an end, good or ill. Even those whose head-heart dichotomy is upset and who malpractice discretion work towards an end. Discretionism, in this regard, is inextricably intertwined with teleology. It is predicated on the attainment of an idea or talent, extrapolated to its most perfect form, and therefore must work towards that vision of perfection.

But what of the apathetic man? What of the individual utterly whose utter lack of intent is not a cynical posture meant to reflect disdain for the world at large, but complete indifference to the basic philosophy of existence? Such a man is irrelevant. If he does not have enough intuitiveness to examine himself, either as a creature of individual spirit or in context of broader truth, he is null, a nonentity.

Whatever mark he leaves upon the world is done by chance. A long chain of causal events with no other link than the circumstantial chances which lead them to various ends- what might be called coincidence if looked at narrowly- act upon him as marionette strings. He can neither resist nor direct their jarring. He cannot be a producer, for production implies positive action, which in itself is predicated on a stimulus rooted in thought or emotion. Anything that is positive is also necessarily negative. An act of discretion is both an endorsement of one value and a simultaneous repudiation of all competing values. But these implications, like volitional acts, whether done with guile or candor, are antithetical to apathy.

What of the individual utterly whose utter lack of intent is not a cynical posture meant to reflect disdain for the world at large, but complete indifference to the basic philosophy of existence? Such a man is irrelevant.

Since the man of apathy shows no regard for his soul, he cannot be given any credence. In a philosophical sense, he does not exist. For spirit is absolute to the degree it is rooted in immutable truth. Existence so complete it transcends temporal laws is solely the domain of the well-ordered soul. Only the consummate man whose long experience has perfected his processes of discretion can attain absolute existence.

The apathetic man is outside the hierarchy of discretion and matches none of the archetypes that result from discretionary malpractice.