Elections are not about partisan unity

Elections are not about unity. They are about competing ideas of right and wrong vying for resonance with the populace. They are about individuals exerting their conscience and branding their interests on the way government functions. They are about local actors reminding the federal government that power flows from the bottom up under the American construction of federalism. Coalitions are an end-run to this system, a way of sidestepping the deep and serious issues facing…

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Being Never Trump does not make me pro-Hillary

My political science professors were fond of telling myself and my classmates that, when analyzing politics, we were not “normal.” By this they meant not only that we processed information differently, both in terms of amount and approach, but also that we were more likely to be motivated by higher degrees of cognizance in our electoral decisions. Voter rationales- the term that explains why people vote as they do- are largely non-ideologically motivated. Generally, most…

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The importance of ideology

Today, society has a decidedly apocalyptic outlook on the state of partisanship, perhaps with some merit. After all the mere mention of an individual’s party or ideological affiliation is generally met with a rancorous, disdainful sneer by those who identify with the opposing position. This is decidedly an unfortunate practice, but it’s hardly a new threat. Factional contentiousness has raged since America’s political antecedents first convened with the aim of practically applying their ideas in…

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How James Comey reconfigured the American legal process

When in 1170 Henry II famously cried in frustration “Will no one rid me of this turbulent priest?” and an overly enthusiastic minion interpreted this as an order to assassinate the cantankerous Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, the king successfully avoided being taken to task by the pope and his fellow Christian rulers by pleading a lack of criminal intent. The fault for the murder lay not with he, despite his ultimate authority, as he…

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Compromise is a myth

There seems to be a consensus in modern America that the culture of government is so bifurcated, so antagonistic that partisan bickering stymies any action. Or so the bloviating media commentators incessantly claim, often citing the paltry number of bills that successfully navigate the journey from bill to law. There is nothing wrong with qualification, but it must be coupled with quantification. He Government organs could pass 15 bills in a week. But, these could…

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The dialectic of the soul

All action stems from either thought or motion- or a lack thereof. Similarly, discretion properly practiced rests on the catalyst of thought or emotion, but subjugated to their own realms. Thus, the discretionary process of an individual depends on the relationship between the head and the heart. The soul is comprised of a dialectic between reason and emotion. Sober, reflective analysis governs thought and passion’s moral-compass informs emotion. A failure to constrain the two- to…

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Only free trade is fair trade

A unit of currency, even those based on elements with empirical worth, has absolute value. But this value is relative, both against other systems of measurement and in context of time and shifting events. Fiat money, like the American dollar, derives its worth as a unit from government-mandates and regulations, making it much more malleable than non-fiat currency, which is based in a commodity, such as gold, with intrinsic value. Yet, even the values assigned…

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